Meet Shanidar Z, A 40-Year-Old Neanderthal Woman Who Lived 75,000 Years Ago

Meet Shanidar Z, A 40-Year-Old Neanderthal Woman Who Lived 75,000 Years Ago

Scientists have reconstructed the skull of a 40-something Neanderthal woman buried in a cave 75,000 years ago. The woman, found in 2018, was given the name Shanidar Z after the cave in Iraqi Kurdistan where she was laid to rest. To learn more about Neanderthal anatomy, scientists spent nine months piecing together Shanidar Z’s skull from 200 bone fragments. “There is some artistic license there,…

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Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 10 Years Later: Texas Company Unveils New Scientific Evidence

Nearly 10 years later, new evidence from an American company sparked hope in the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370, with officials expressing confidence in approving a new search proposal, regardless of its cost. Texas-based company Ocean Infinity reportedly claimed to have found scientific evidence of the plane’s final resting place at the…

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New Study Reveals Mismatch Between Tattoo Ink Contents And Label Description In US Market

If you’ve been tattooed in the US, the ink under your skin may have more components than you previously imagined, a new study reveals. The study, conducted by Binghamton University and titled “What’s in my ink: An analysis of commercial tattoo ink on the U.S. market,” shows discrepancies between the ingredient labels on tattoo ink and the actual substances in the bottle….

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New Study On Rodents Finds “Surprising” Neurological Effects Of Orgasms In Long-Term Bonds

Scientists have long acknowledged the significance of social bonds in improving quality of life, reducing stress, and prolonging lifespan among diverse species. A new study attempts to explore this subject further, looking into the neural mechanisms behind such bonds in the context of romantic and enduring partnerships. The study, published in the journal eLife, has unveiled the…

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Scientists May Have Found The “Oldest Known Hunting Architecture In The World” In Europe

Numerous captivating historical artifacts have emerged from the Stone Age. One of the latest discoveries dating back to the fascinating period is believed to represent one of the oldest and largest known man-made hunting structures in Europe and was unveiled from the depth of the sea. Scientists have recently found structures from the Stone Age that can provide unique…

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Bronze Age Iran Provides Earliest Evidence Of The Invention Of The Lipstick, New Discovery Shows

Have we just found the predecessor of the lipstick? Archeologists found a small chlorite vial discovered among numerous artifacts looted and recovered in the Jiroft region of Kerman province, southeastern Iran, containing a deep red cosmetic preparation that is likely a lip-coloring paint or paste. Through analytical research involving the use of X-ray diffraction, scanning…

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Men And Women Have Different Interpretations For Emojis, Research Shows

Women interpret emojis differently to men, a new study suggests. Researchers selected 24 emojis—taken from Apple, Windows, Android, and WeChat platforms—and labeled them according to six emotional states: happy, disgusted, fearful, sad, surprised, and angry. They found women were able to more accurately interpret happy, fearful, sad, and angry emoji labels compared to men. Meanwhile, the…

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